Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Acer sieboldianum

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Acer sieboldianum

 

This species has also been known as:

Acer sieboldianum f. dissectum, Acer sieboldianum var. mandshuricum, Acer sieboldianum var. microphyllum, Acer sieboldianum f. microphyllum, Acer sieboldianum var. tsushimense, Acer sieboldianum var. yezoense

 

Common names:

Siebold's Maple, Kohauchiwakaede

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Acer sieboldianum: 44]

 

Acer sieboldianum.jpg

 

Popularity of Acer sieboldianum over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Acer sieboldianum (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 if there are sufficient numbers of papers (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Acer sieboldianum as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 if there are sufficient numbers of papers (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 197]

 

Species diversity (4), Forest ecosystem management (3), Plant emissivity (3), Remote sensing (3), SEBASS (3), Thermal infrared (3), topography (3), beech forest (2), Bleached litter (2), Conifer plantation (2), Functional traits (2), Fungi (2), growth stress (2), Life form (2), Lignin (2), Population structure (2), reaction wood (2), Recruitment limitation (2), Seed dispersal (2), Seed size (2), Vegetation development (2), Xylariaceae (2), Acer sieboldianum (1), Advance regeneration (1), allometry (1), Altitudinal zone (1), ambrosia beetle (1), artificial rearing (1), Bark chemical contents (1), Bark stripping (1), Bark-stripping (1), bending mechanism (1), Beta diversity (1), biomass (1), Biometric method (1), body size variation (1), Buried seed (1), butterfly community (1), canopy openness (1), Carbon uptake (1), cell wall components (1), cell walls (1), Cellular solids (1), cellulose (1), Cervus nippon (1), Clearcutting (1), coexistence (1), Community dynamics (1), Composite (1), conifer-hardwood mixed forest (1), conservation (1), cool-temperate (1), Cool-temperate forest (1), Cryptomeria japonica (1), deciduous broad-leaved forest (1), Declining population (1), deformation (1), density (1), desorption (1), Diameter distribution (1), dioecy (1), Distribution pattern (1), Disturbance (1), Disturbance regimes (1), diversity hotspots (1), dwarf bamboo (1), Ecological forest site classification (1), Edge effects (1), electron probe analyzer (1), equations (1), Fagus crenata (1), fine distribution (1), fire severity (1), Fir-hemlock forests (1), floral display size (1), Forest biomass (1), Forest disturbance (1), forest edge (1), Forest management (1), Gapmaker (1), generalist pollinator (1), geomorphic process (1), gravitropism (1), Human activity (1), Kanumazawa Riparian Research Forest (1), Landscape ecology (1), Lattice models (1), leaf standing crop (1), Light conditions (1), light environment (1), Litter accumulation (1), Long-rotation plantation (1), Lucidophyllous forest (1), Matrix projection model (1), mechanical stress (1), Micromechanics (1), Mn (1), Model selection (1), modulus of elasticity (1), Mortality (1), Mt. Ohdaigahara (1), Natural materials (1), Naturally regenerated trees (1), Net primary production (1), Oak regeneration (1), Ogawa Forest Reserve (1), Ohdaigahara (1), Parafontaria laminata armigera (1), phototropism (1), physical models (1), Plant functional types (1), population dynamics (1), Quercus crispula (1), rarity hotspots (1), Recruitment (1), regulation of branching (1), reproduction (1), resource heterogeneity (1), resource utilization (1), resource-dependent oviposition (1), resprouting (1), Rhus trichocarpa (1), Riparian forest (1), Sasa tsuboiana (1), Scolytidae (1), Secondary forest (1), Seed-dispersal type (1), Seed-dispersal types (1), seedling (1), Seedling establishment (1), shade-tolerance (1), shrinkage (1), Sika deer (1), Size-class distribution (1), Snap-off (1), snow pressure (1), soil invertebrates (1), Soil seed bank (1), spatial distribution of light (1), spatial distribution patterns (1), Species classification (1), Species richness (1), Species traits (1), Stand structure (1), stem reorientation (1), tensile strength (1), tension wood (1), Terrace forest (1), Thinning (1), trade-offs (1), tree (1), tree architecture (1), Tree bark preference (1), tree distribution (1), tree growth (1), ultrastructure (1), Uprooting (1), vegetation pattern analysis (1), vegetation regeneration (1), VERHOEFF (1), visitation frequency (1), wavelength dispersive type X-ray spectrometers (1), Windthrow (1), Wood (1), wood fibers (1), X-ray microanalysis (1), Xylosandrus mutilatus (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

wood fibre (59.18), timber (23.20), shade (10.16), medicinal (1.17), poison (0.93), weed (0.67), fruit (0.43), cane/bamboo (0.37), cereal (0.28), nutraceutical (0.26).....

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Wijewardana NS, Müller K, Moldrup P, Clothier B, Komatsu T, Hiradate S, de Jonge LW and Kawamoto K (2016) Soil-water repellency characteristic curves for soil profiles with organic carbon gradients. Geoderma 264, Part A, 150-159. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016706115301142

Chang S-S, Quignard F, Alméras T and Clair B (2015) Mesoporosity changes from cambium to mature tension wood: a new step toward the understanding of maturation stress generation in trees. New Phytologist 205, 1277-1287. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.13126

Gorshkova T, Mokshina N, Chernova T, Ibragimova N, Salnikov V, Mikshina P, Tryfona T, Banasiak A, Immerzeel P, Dupree P and Mellerowicz EJ (2015) Aspen Tension Wood Fibers Contain {beta}-(1->4)-Galactans and Acidic Arabinogalactans Retained by Cellulose Microfibrils in Gelatinous Walls. Plant Physiology 169, 2048-2063. http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/abstract/169/3/2048

Gritsch C, Wan Y, Mitchell RAC, Shewry PR, Hanley SJ and Karp A (2015) G-fibre cell wall development in willow stems during tension wood induction. J. Exp. Bot. 66, 6447-6459. http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/66/20/6447

Masaki T, Hata S and Ide Y (2015) Heterogeneity in soil water and light environments and dispersal limitation: what facilitates tree species coexistence in a temperate forest? Plant Biology 17, 449-458. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/plb.12253

Roussel J-R and Clair B (2015) Evidence of the late lignification of the G-layer in Simarouba tension wood, to assist understanding how non-G-layer species produce tensile stress. Tree Physiol 35, 1366-1377. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/35/12/1366

Yoshimura M (2015) Stable isotope proxies for evaluating biodiversity in stream biota. Ecological Indicators 57, 228-235. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X15002083

Nakajima H and Ishida M (2014) Decline of Quercus crispula in abandoned coppice forests caused by secondary succession and Japanese oak wilt disease: Stand dynamics over twenty years. Forest Ecology and Management 334, 18-27. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112714005106

Olatinwo R, Streett D and Carlton C (2014) Habitat Suitability under Changing Climatic Conditions for the Exotic Ambrosia Beetle, Cnestus mutilatus (Curculionidae: Scolytinae: Xyleborini) in the Southeastern United States. Ann Entomol Soc Am 107, 782-788. http://aesa.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/107/4/782

Osono T, Tateno O and Masuya H (2013) Diversity and ubiquity of xylariaceous endophytes in live and dead leaves of temperate forest trees. Mycoscience 54, 54-61. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1340354012000125

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Acer sieboldianum: 44; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

 

Osono T, Tateno O, Masuya H (2013) Diversity and ubiquity of xylariaceous endophytes in live and dead leaves of temperate forest trees. Mycoscience 54, 54-61. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1340354012000125

Clair B, Almeras T, Pilate G, Jullien D, Sugiyama J, Riekel C (2011) Maturation Stress Generation in Poplar Tension Wood Studied by Synchrotron Radiation Microdiffraction. Plant Physiology 155, 562-70. http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/abstract/155/1/562

Noguchi M, Okuda S, Miyamoto K, Itou T, Inagaki Y (2011) Composition, size structure and local variation of naturally regenerated broadleaved tree species in hinoki cypress plantations: a case study in Shikoku, south-western Japan. Forestry 84, 493-504. http://forestry.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/84/5/493

Clair B, Almeras T, Pilate G, Jullien D, Sugiyama J, Riekel C (2010) Maturation Stress Generation in Poplar Tension Wood Studied by Synchrotron Radiation Microdiffraction. Plant Physiology 152, 1650-8. http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/abstract/152/3/1650

Gonzales RS, Nakashizuka T (2010) Broad-leaf species composition in Cryptomeria japonica plantations with respect to distance from natural forest. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 2133-40. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112710001441

Ribeiro da Luz B, Crowley JK (2010) Identification of plant species by using high spatial and spectral resolution thermal infrared (8.0–13.5 μm) imagery. Remote Sensing of Environment 114, 404-13. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034425709002910

Tateishi M, Kumagai To, Suyama Y, Hiura T (2010) Differences in transpiration characteristics of Japanese beech trees, Fagus crenata, in Japan. Tree Physiol 30, 748-60. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/30/6/748

Aiba M, Nakashizuka T (2009) Architectural differences associated with adult stature and wood density in 30 temperate tree species. Functional Ecology 23, 265-73. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2435.2008.01500.x

Chang S-S, Clair B, Ruelle J, Beauchene J, Di Renzo F, Quignard F, Zhao G-J, Yamamoto H, Gril J (2009) Mesoporosity as a new parameter for understanding tension stress generation in trees. J. Exp. Bot. 60, 3023-30. http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/60/11/3023

Matsuyama S, Osawa N, Sakimoto M (2009) Generalist pollinators in the dioecious shrub Rhus trichocarpa Miq. (Anacardiaceae) and their role in reproductive success. Plant Species Biology 24, 215-24. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-1984.2009.00258.x

Miller-Rushing AJ, Primack RB, Templer PH, Rathbone S, Mukunda S (2009) Long-term relationships among atmospheric CO2, stomata, and intrinsic water use efficiency in individual trees. Am. J. Botany 96, 1779-86. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/96/10/1779

Arend M (2008) Immunolocalization of (1,4)-{beta}-galactan in tension wood fibers of poplar. Tree Physiol 28, 1263-7. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/28/8/1263

Fisher JB (2008) Anatomy of axis contraction in seedlings from a fire prone habitat. Am. J. Botany 95, 1337-48. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/95/11/1337

Matsuyama S, Sakimoto M (2008) Allocation to Reproduction and Relative Reproductive Costs in Two Species of Dioecious Anacardiaceae with Contrasting Phenology. Ann. Bot. 101, 1391-400. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/101/9/1391

Mishnaevsky Jr L, Qing H (2008) Micromechanical modelling of mechanical behaviour and strength of wood: State-of-the-art review. Computational Materials Science 44, 363-70. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927025608001882

Sano T, Ohsawa M (2008) Classification and comparison of oak dominated forests on the eroded fan remnant at the foot of Yatsugatake volcano, central Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 255, 817-29. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112707007566

Matsuzaki JUN, Masumori M, Tange T (2007) Phototropic bending of non-elongating and radially growing woody stems results from asymmetrical xylem formation. Plant, Cell & Environment 30, 646-53. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2007.01656.x

Nishikubo N, Awano T, et al. (2007) Xyloglucan Endo-transglycosylase (XET) Functions in Gelatinous Layers of Tension Wood Fibers in Poplar—A Glimpse into the Mechanism of the Balancing Act of Trees. Plant Cell Physiol. 48, 843-55. http://pcp.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/48/6/843

Nagaike T, Hayashi A, Kubo M, Takahashi K, Abe M, Arai N (2006) Changes in plant species diversity over 5 years in Larix kaempferi plantations and abandoned coppice forests in central Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 236, 278-85. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112706009005

Utsugi E, Kanno H, Ueno N, Tomita M, Saitoh T, Kimura M, Kanou K, Seiwa K (2006) Hardwood recruitment into conifer plantations in Japan: Effects of thinning and distance from neighboring hardwood forests. Forest Ecology and Management 237, 15-28. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112706008991

Ishida H, Hattori T, Takeda Y (2005) Comparison of species composition and richness between primary and secondary lucidophyllous forests in two altitudinal zones of Tsushima Island, Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 213, 273-87. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112705002124

Ohtsuka T, Akiyama T, Hashimoto Y, Inatomi M, Sakai T, Jia S, Mo W, Tsuda S, Koizumi H (2005) Biometric based estimates of net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 134, 27-38. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168192305002297

Yamamoto H, Abe K, Arakawa Y, Okuyama T, Gril J (2005) Role of the gelatinous layer (G-layer) on the origin of the physical properties of the tension wood of Acer sieboldianum. Journal of wood science. 51, 3.

Goto Y (2004) Early post-fire vegetation regeneration in Larix kaempferi artificial forests with an undergrowth of Sasa senanensis. Ecological Research 19, 311-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1703.2004.00640.x

Ando M, Yokota H-O, Shibata Ei (2003) Bark stripping preference of sika deer, Cervus nippon, in terms of bark chemical contents. Forest Ecology and Management 177, 323-31. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112702003365

Hirayama K, Sakimoto M (2003) Spatial distribution of canopy and subcanopy species along a sloping topography in a cool-temperate conifer-hardwood forest in the snowy region of Japan. Ecological Research 18, 443-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1703.2003.00568.x

Kitahara M, Watanabe M (2003) Diversity and rarity hotspots and conservation of butterfly communities in and around the Aokigahara woodland of Mount Fuji, central Japan. Ecological Research 18, 503-22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1703.2003.00574.x

Kohira M, Ninomiya I (2003) Detecting tree populations at risk for forest conservation management: using single-year vs. long-term inventory data. Forest Ecology and Management 174, 423-35. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112702000762

Nagaike T, Hayashi A (2003) Bark-stripping by Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in Larix kaempferi plantations in central Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 175, 563-72. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112702002219

Nagaike T, Hayashi A, Abe M, Arai N (2003) Differences in plant species diversity in Larix kaempferi plantations of different ages in central Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 183, 177-93. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112703001051

Nagamatsu D, Hirabuki Y, Mochida Y (2003) Influence of micro-landforms on forest structure, tree death and recruitment in a Japanese temperate mixed forest. Ecological Research 18, 533-47. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1703.2003.00576.x

Sun Q, Yoda K, Suzuki M, Suzuki H (2003) Vascular tissue in the stem and roots of woody plants can conduct light. J. Exp. Bot. 54, 1627-35. http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/54/387/1627

Tateno R, Takeda H (2003) Forest structure and tree species distribution in relation to topography-mediated heterogeneity of soil nitrogen and light at the forest floor. Ecological Research 18, 559-71. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1703.2003.00578.x

Nagaike T (2002) Differences in plant species diversity between conifer (Larix kaempferi) plantations and broad-leaved (Quercus crispula) secondary forests in central Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 168, 111-23. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112701007344

Suzuki W, Osumi K, Masaki T, Takahashi K, Daimaru H, Hoshizaki K (2002) Disturbance regimes and community structures of a riparian and an adjacent terrace stand in the Kanumazawa Riparian Research Forest, northern Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 157, 285-301. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112700006678

Konno Y (2001) Feedback regulation of constant leaf standing crop in Sasa tsuboiana grasslands. Ecological Research 16, 459-69. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1703.2001.00421.x

Ida H (2000) Treefall gap disturbance in an old-growth beech forest in southwestern Japan by a catastrophic typhoon. Journal of Vegetation Science 11, 825-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3236552

Akashi N, Nakashizuka T (1999) Effects of bark-stripping by Sika deer (Cervus nippon) on population dynamics of a mixed forest in Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 113, 75-82. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112798004150

Niijima K (1998) Effects of outbreak of the train millipede Parafontaria laminata armigera Verhoeff (Diplopoda: Xystodesmidae) on litter decomposition in a natural beech forest in Central Japan. 1. Density and biomass of soil invertebrates. Ecological Research 13, 41-53. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1703.1998.00242.x

SUMIDA A, KOMIYAMA A (1997) Crown Spread Patterns for Five Deciduous Broad-leaved Woody Species: Ecological Significance of the Retention Patterns of Larger Branches. Ann. Bot. 80, 759-66. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/80/6/759

Higo M, Shinohara A, Kodama S (1995) The regeneration behavior of major component species in the secondary forest dominated byPinus densiflora and Quercus serrata in central Japan. Forest Ecology and Management 76, 1-10. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/037811279503564Q

Kajimura H, Hijii N (1994) Reproduction and resource utilization of the ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus mutilatus, in field and experimental populations. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 71, 121-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1570-7458.1994.tb01778.x

Memon AR, Chino M, Hara K, Yatazawa M (1981) Microdistribution of manganese in the leaf tissues of different plant species as revealed by X-ray microanalyzer. Physiologia Plantarum 53, 225-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.1981.tb04491.x

Takaishi K (1971) The content of coumarin analogues in red leaves of higher plants. Phytochemistry 10, 719-22. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942200971383

Anonymous (1886) TERNSTRŒMIACEÆ. Journal of the Linnean Society of London, Botany 23, 81-162. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8339.1886.tb00531.x

Gonzales RS, Nakashizuka T Broad-leaf species composition in Cryptomeria japonica plantations with respect to distance from natural forest. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 2133-40. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112710001441

Noguchi M, Okuda S, Miyamoto K, Itou T, Inagaki Y Composition, size structure and local variation of naturally regenerated broad leaved tree species in hinoki cypress plantations: a case study in Shikoku, south-western Japan. Forestry, cpr027. http://forestry.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/cpr027v1

Osono T, Tateno O, Masuya H Diversity and ubiquity of xylariaceous endophytes in live and dead leaves of temperate forest trees. Mycoscience 54, 54-61. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1340354012000125

Ribeiro da Luz B, Crowley JK Identification of plant species by using high spatial and spectral resolution thermal infrared (8.0-13.5 [mu]m) imagery. Remote Sensing of Environment 114, 404-13. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034425709002910

Ribeiro da Luz B, Crowley JK Identification of plant species by using high spatial and spectral resolution thermal infrared (8.0–13.5 Î¼m) imagery. Remote Sensing of Environment 114, 404-13. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034425709002910

Tateishi M, Kumagai To, Suyama Y, Hiura T Differences in transpiration characteristics of Japanese beech trees, Fagus crenata, in Japan. Tree Physiol 30, 748-60. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/30/6/748

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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