Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Daviesia leptophylla

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Daviesia leptophylla

 

This species has also been known as:

Daviesia virgata

 

Common names:

Narrow-Leaf Bitter-Pea

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Daviesia leptophylla: 11]

 

 

Popularity of Daviesia leptophylla over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Daviesia leptophylla (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Daviesia leptophylla as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 57]

 

Plant traits (4), Bradyrhizobium (3), Land-use change (3), Abandoned farmland (2), Australia (2), Biodiversity (2), Biogeography (2), Climate change (2), Dispersal (2), Geographical isolation (2), Horticulture (2), Landscape preference (2), Leguminosae (2), Life form (2), Multilocus sequence analysis (2), Native plants (2), Natural regeneration (2), nodA gene (2), Plantation (2), Seed bank (2), Specific leaf area (2), dnaK (1), lateral gene transfer (1), migration (1), multiple origins (1), nifD (1), phylogeography (1), recA (1), rRNA (1), Seed size (1), Shade tolerance (1), source regions (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

ornamental (49.35), grain legume (32.43), charcoal (7.11), medicinal (1.39), shade (1.28), fruit (1.02), poison (1.01), weed (0.77), starch (0.46), cereal (0.32)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Kasel S, Bell TL, Enright NJ and Meers TL (2015) Restoration potential of native forests after removal of conifer plantation: A perspective from Australia. Forest Ecology and Management 338, 148-162. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112714006902

Stepanova AV, Kotina EL, Tilney PM and Van Wyk BE (2013) Wood and bark anatomy of Hypocalyptus support its isolated taxonomic position in Leguminosae. South African Journal of Botany 89, 234-239. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629913003037

Kendal D, Williams KJH and Williams NSG (2012) Plant traits link people’s plant preferences to the composition of their gardens. Landscape and Urban Planning 105, 34-42. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204611003458

Meers TL, Enright NJ, Bell TL and Kasel S (2012) Deforestation strongly affects soil seed banks in eucalypt forests: Generalisations in functional traits and implications for restoration. Forest Ecology and Management 266, 94-107. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711006803

Stępkowski T, Watkin E, McInnes A, Gurda D, Gracz J and Steenkamp ET (2012) Distinct Bradyrhizbium communities nodulate legumes native to temperate and tropical monsoon Australia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63, 265-277. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105579031100546X

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Daviesia leptophylla: 11; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Kendal D, Williams KJH and Williams NSG (2012) Plant traits link people’s plant preferences to the composition of their gardens. Landscape and Urban Planning 105, 34-42. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204611003458

Meers TL, Enright NJ, Bell TL and Kasel S (2012) Deforestation strongly affects soil seed banks in eucalypt forests: Generalisations in functional traits and implications for restoration. Forest Ecology and Management 266, 94-107. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711006803

Stępkowski T, Watkin E, McInnes A, Gurda D, Gracz J and Steenkamp ET (2012) Distinct Bradyrhizbium communities nodulate legumes native to temperate and tropical monsoon Australia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63, 265-77. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105579031100546X

Andam CP and Parker MA (2008) ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Origins of Bradyrhizobium nodule symbionts from two legume trees in the Philippines. Journal of Biogeography 35, 1030-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2007.01844.x

Kasel S (2008) Eucalypt establishment on former pine plantations in north-east Victoria: An evaluation of revegetation techniques. Ecological Management & Restoration 9, 150-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-8903.2008.00408.x

Meers TL, Bell TL, Enright NJ and Kasel S (2008) Role of plant functional traits in determining vegetation composition of abandoned grazing land in north-eastern Victoria, Australia. Journal of Vegetation Science 19, 515-24. http://dx.doi.org/10.3170/2008-8-18401

Bickford S and Gell P (2005) Holocene vegetation change, Aboriginal wetland use and the impact of European settlement on the Fleurieu Peninsula, South Australia. The Holocene 15, 200-15. http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/15/2/200

You Z, Marutani M and Borthakur D (2002) Diversity among Bradyrhizobium isolates nodulating yardlong bean and sunnhemp in Guam. Journal of Applied Microbiology 93, 577-84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2672.2002.01733.x

Chen LS, Figueredo A, Pedrosa FO and Hungria M (2000) Genetic Characterization of Soybean Rhizobia in Paraguay. Appl. Envir. Microbiol. 66, 5099-103. http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/66/11/5099

Parker MA and Lunk A (2000) Relationships of bradyrhizobia from Platypodium and Machaerium (Papilionoideae: tribe Dalbergieae) on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 50, 1179-86. http://ijs.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/50/3/1179

Lafay B and Burdon JJ (1998) Molecular Diversity of Rhizobia Occurring on Native Shrubby Legumes in Southeastern Australia. Appl. Envir. Microbiol. 64, 3989-97. http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/64/10/3989

Kendal D, Williams KJH and Williams NSG Plant traits link people’s plant preferences to the composition of their gardens. Landscape and Urban Planning 105, 34-42. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204611003458

Meers TL, Enright NJ, Bell TL and Kasel S Deforestation strongly affects soil seed banks in eucalypt forests: Generalisations in functional traits and implications for restoration. Forest Ecology and Management 266, 94-107. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711006803

Meers TL, Kasel S, Bell TL and Enright NJ Conversion of native forest to exotic Pinus radiata plantation: Response of understorey plant composition using a plant functional trait approach. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 399-409. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709007774

Stępkowski T, Watkin E, McInnes A, Gurda D, Gracz J and Steenkamp ET Distinct Bradyrhizbium communities nodulate legumes native to temperate and tropical monsoon Australia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63, 265-77. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105579031100546X

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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